I went out for some more intervals today, similar to the previous 3X12 and 4X12 intervals I wrote about. This time I chose to do 10 minute intervals because the 12 minute ones covered the length of the road at East Miramar, and I figured doing 5X10 would only be a small increase from 4X12. I kept the same rest interval, 3 minutes, but didn’t keep the intervals exactly at 10 minutes. With the 12 minute intervals I had the visual cue of the road ending soon, so I knew I was at the end of the interval. I kept the same power goal of 300 watts, didn’t pay much attention to cadence, just went by feel, and did the last interval with 53X12 gearing.

Int

Time

Cadence

AP

NP

1

10:25

92

305

299

2

10:00

91

309

303

3

10:16

93

308

301

4

10:32

89

303

298

5

10:51

66

320

317

Overall, I feel pretty good with each split. Even the first interval was a bit more challenging today than three days ago because my TSB today is -17, and on Monday it was -14.8. I did a 17 mile run yesterday evening which my legs were still feeling. The last interval was at the low end of my L4 (threshold), which wasn’t my goal, but it felt good pushing with tired legs.

Today I came across a blog post where the author took a beginning ironman training plan and mapped out the performance management chart (PMC). You can read the post here. There are some interesting points that could be made from the author’s revelations as he mapped out the 20 week training plan. I think the post shows how many of us (myself definitely) are trying to figure out how to effectively use a power meter, analysis software, design training plans, etc. I was talking to a triathlete a couple weeks ago that was commenting on how he liked the data analysis I write about in my blog, but that he doesn’t really understand any of it. I said “oh, you don’t have a power meter?” and he said “actually I do!” There is so much being said about power meters that many people think they should buy one, but when you end up with one, what do you do with it? These are great tools for coaches because the data is so quantified, and if the coach is familiar with how to analyze the data they can really tweek an athlete’s training plan and make sure the athlete is progressing toward their goals effectively. Most people don’t have a coach, however, and even if you do have a coach it is pretty cool learning about how the power meter can be used to improve your training.

I certainly welcome comments/questions/feedback. I had a good discussion with TCSD member Brad Wise, and I think those discussions are important to learning how to self-coach more effectively. Brad’s blog is here.

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